The Vivaldi browser takes a stand against Google’s new advertising tracking tech called “Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC)“:

At Vivaldi, we stand up for the privacy rights of our users. We do not approve of Google’s new FLoC technology. It creates privacy risks for users on the web.

Vivaldi says no to FLoC

The EFF does not mince its words either: Google’s FLoC Is a Terrible Idea.

Other privacy-oriented browser companies are already taking the same stand. Unfortunately, with Chrome’s browser market share of nearly 70% I really don’t know how much it will matter, as the vast majority of Chrome users are most likely blissfully unaware of the dangerous implications of this new and hidden tracking technology.

Source: No, Google! Vivaldi users will not get FloC’ed. | Vivaldi Browser

Gallery Logo

Gallery Project logo

A small update after a long time: After my web host SDF.org changed the HTTP server from good old Apache to Nginx last year, the Gallery has been broken, mostly due to lack of support for user-specified Apache .htaccess and mod_rewrite rules in Nginx. Fortunately I’ve now gotten it sorted out with a little assistance from the SDF admins and the very helpful people at the Gallery3 mailing group. Some server configuration for PHP had to be changed, and it was actually just a pretty small fix.

The Gallery Project has been around since 2001, when I first installed it. Unfortunately the project’s been in hibernation since 2014, but lately there’s been an attempt to make it work on newer PHP versions and fix some bugs, called Gallery Revival, and the code is available on GitHub.

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This person does not exist – a random gallery of computer-generated faces, created with machine-learning algorithms called GANs. The technology to create these is very impressive, considering how realistic a lot of these look — and at the same kind of scary.

Computer-generated face

Computer-generated face

Of course scammers and other internet lowlifes have been using stolen or stock-image faces for a long time to add authenticity to fake social media profiles, this basically means that now they can just create random faces that will be very convincing, at least in most cases.

There are, at least for now, various ways to recognize fake AI-generated images by subtle hints, but the algorithms can only get better at this over time. Maybe recognizing these faces will be a necessary skill to have in times to come?

Related: Which face is real?

Bitcoin, cryptocurrency, blockchain—these things are huge, right? Still unsure if you should invest your time or money? Don’t know the difference between a Satoshi and a gigahash? Well, stock photography is here to help give us a sense of the inner workings, background, and the dos and don’ts of the bitcoin ecosystem.

Bitcoins are not for consumption!

Bitcoins are not for consumption!

Source: Bitcoin: A Stock Photo Cryptocurrency Primer – The Atlantic

The awesome people at Internet Archive have released a huge collection featuring thousands of emulated games, demos and applications from the Commodore Amiga home computer, running in the browser through the magic of emulation.

I’d still recommend a good emulator, like FS-UAE or WinUAE, to actually run these games without a lot of stuttering sound and hangs, as the in-browser emulation is not exactly optimal, but at least it works to showcase the vast number of great software that ran on the Amiga.

Amiga Juggler demo

Amiga Juggler demo

Link: Software Library: Amiga : Free Texts : Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is always a source of awesome retro-computing goodies.

The Malware Museum is a collection of malware programs, usually viruses, that were distributed in the 1980s and 1990s on home computers. Once they infected a system, they would sometimes show animation or messages that you had been infected. Through the use of emulations, and additionally removing any destructive routines within the viruses, this collection allows you to experience virus infection of decades ago with safety.

Malware Example: KUKU.COM

Source: The Malware Museum : Free Software : Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

A couple of years old – but a very interesting story on NPR about the SDF community, where my site is hosted.

Before Facebook and MySpace transformed how we interact online, there was another kind of Internet: the SDF network, made up of users connecting via phone lines and code. Around the world, 30,000 computing enthusiasts still use that network today.

Source: In Noisy Digital Era, ‘Elegant’ Internet Still Thrives : NPR