Northern Disco Lights – The Rise and Rise of Norwegian Dance Music – really cool new documentary about the rise of the Norwegian electronic dance music scene, affectionately known as “Trømso-techno” or “Space Disco”. It also has an awesome soundtrack featuring artists like Biosphere, Bjørn Torske, Prins Thomas, Mungolian Jet Set, Mental Overdrive, Rune Lindbæk, Lindstrøm and more!

Northern Disco Lights tells the untold story of a group of teenagers in the arctic city of Tromsø, who set off a chain of events that would go on to transform their country. To escape the boredom of growing up in a remote outpost they created their own music scene, setting up radio stations, parties, building synthesizers and making tunes. Word spread as like-minded souls recognised the call to arms and inspired a generation of kids who would go on to change dance music and Norway forever.

Purchase Northern Disco Lights – The Rise and Rise of Norwegian Dance Music from Vimeo Ondemand.

Some really uplifting reading; the Bandcamp 2016 year in review.

…every aspect of Bandcamp’s business was up in 2016. Digital album sales grew 20%, tracks 23%, and merch 34%. Growth in physical sales was led by vinyl, which was up 48%, and further boosted by CDs (up 14%) and cassettes (up 58%).

Unfortunately, times are not so great for the artists overall with the rise of streaming services.

As more people subscribe to music rental services, the already paltry rates paid to artists are going down (and no, artists don’t necessarily make it up in volume).

Buy your music directly from independent artists, and don’t let the record companies decide what is available to you!

Source: Everything is Terrific: The Bandcamp 2016 Year in Review « Bandcamp Daily

Very cool blog post from D-Pad Studio, the developers of the upcoming (and beautiful) Owl Boy on the recent trend of 8/16 bit pixel art aesthetic in games and the differences between the actual pixel art style, which was born out of necessity and hardware limitations, and the new stylistic “Hi-Bit” look.

While these games may be paying homage to the 16-bit era that started with the Super Nintendo (1990) and Sega Mega Drive (1988, a.k.a. Genesis), they’re working beyond the limitations of the tech in the 90s.

Some upcoming favourites: Rain World, The Last Night (awesome video below)

Source: D-Pad Studio – creators of Owlboy

The awesome people at Internet Archive have released a huge collection featuring thousands of emulated games, demos and applications from the Commodore Amiga home computer, running in the browser through the magic of emulation.

I’d still recommend a good emulator, like FS-UAE or WinUAE, to actually run these games without a lot of stuttering sound and hangs, as the in-browser emulation is not exactly optimal, but at least it works to showcase the vast number of great software that ran on the Amiga.

Amiga Juggler demo

Amiga Juggler demo

Link: Software Library: Amiga : Free Texts : Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is always a source of awesome retro-computing goodies.

The Malware Museum is a collection of malware programs, usually viruses, that were distributed in the 1980s and 1990s on home computers. Once they infected a system, they would sometimes show animation or messages that you had been infected. Through the use of emulations, and additionally removing any destructive routines within the viruses, this collection allows you to experience virus infection of decades ago with safety.

Malware Example: KUKU.COM

Source: The Malware Museum : Free Software : Download & Streaming : Internet Archive