Very cool blog post from D-Pad Studio, the developers of the upcoming (and beautiful) Owl Boy on the recent trend of 8/16 bit pixel art aesthetic in games and the differences between the actual pixel art style, which was born out of necessity and hardware limitations, and the new stylistic “Hi-Bit” look.

While these games may be paying homage to the 16-bit era that started with the Super Nintendo (1990) and Sega Mega Drive (1988, a.k.a. Genesis), they’re working beyond the limitations of the tech in the 90s.

Some upcoming favourites: Rain World, The Last Night (screenshot below).

The Last Night screenshot

The Last Night

Source: D-Pad Studio – creators of Owlboy

The awesome people at Internet Archive have released a huge collection featuring thousands of emulated games, demos and applications from the Commodore Amiga home computer, running in the browser through the magic of emulation.

I’d still recommend a good emulator, like FS-UAE or WinUAE, to actually run these games without a lot of stuttering sound and hangs, as the in-browser emulation is not exactly optimal, but at least it works to showcase the vast number of great software that ran on the Amiga.

Amiga -The Juggler Demo

Amiga -The Juggler Demo

Link: Software Library: Amiga : Free Texts : Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is always a source of awesome retro-computing goodies.

The Malware Museum is a collection of malware programs, usually viruses, that were distributed in the 1980s and 1990s on home computers. Once they infected a system, they would sometimes show animation or messages that you had been infected. Through the use of emulations, and additionally removing any destructive routines within the viruses, this collection allows you to experience virus infection of decades ago with safety.

Malware Example: KUKU.COM

Source: The Malware Museum : Free Software : Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

Sourced from over forty hours of 80s commercials pulled from warped VHS tapes, Memorex is a deep exploration of nostalgia and the cultural values of an era of excess. It’s a re-contextualization of ads – cultural detritus, the lowest of the low – into something altogether more profound, humorous, and at times, even beautiful.